Selangor History

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Selangor's history dates to the 16th century, when rich tin deposits were found in the region. The area's natural wealth, along with its relative freedom from the presence of the Dutch, attracted miners, immigrants and colonizers. One especially important group of settlers were the Bugis, a Malay people from Macassar (now Ujung Padang) in Celebes. Bugis emigration from this great port city followed the steady encroachment of the Dutch over territory previously dominated by Portuguese traders, with whom the Bugis had allied themselves. Renowned for their capabilities as sea traders and warriors, the Bugis soon rose to prominence in Selangor. By 1700 they dominated the state both politically and economically and had established the present Sultanate of Selangor.

Over the course of the eighteenth century, Selangor extended its sphere of influence to become a regional political power. As the western colonial presence increased over the following century, in-fighting between the Bugis, Chinese and Malay nobility forced Selangor to accept the presence of a British Resident in 1874. Unsurprisingly, this foothold in the prosperous state's administration proved out to be rather obstinate. In 1896, the British included Selangor in the Federated Malay States, at about the same time that rubber cultivation began in Malaysia. In 1948 the state joined the Federation of Malaya.

In 1957 the Federation became an independent state within the Commonwealth of Nations. In 1974, the country's capital city of Kuala Lumpur and some of the surrounding areas were ceded to the Federal Government for the establishment of Wilayah Persekutuan, a Federal Territory.

Today Selangor is Malaysia's richest and most developed state. It is home to the largest port in the country, Port Klang, and to many of the country's largest industrial operations, found particularly in the Klang Valley. Its highly diversified economy ranges from agriculture, industry, and commerce to tourism. While industry is rapidly expanding, the mainstays of the state's economy remain rubber, palm-oil, and tin mining. Port Klang, already the largest port in the country, is experiencing vigorous development. Tourism is also beginning to have a major impact on the economy. Selangor completely surrounds the Federal Territory of Wilayah Persekutuan, and there are many close economic and social ties between them.





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